Type and Exploring Personal Growth Pathways – Alex MacFarlane

personal growth

November 6, 2020 @ 1:30 pm 2:30 pm Australia/Sydney

Research regarding optimal human personal development has identified specific steps regarding this form of growth process experienced in one way or another by all humans. In an opposite vein, the research regarding the human deficiencies and dysfunctions we want to overcome indicates these crippling factors are individualised, not experienced by all, and are dependent on nature (our inborn cognitive preferences) and our nurture. This session will broadly outline dysfunctions typical for each psychological type and the overarching steps involved in optimal growth. It will then set about, by group discussion, to explore our individual lived experiences in this process.

Alex MacFarlane
Alex MacFarlane

Alex MacFarlane  
Alex MacFarlane is a clinical and consultant psychologist specialised in the application of psychological type and temperament as a core therapeutic tool in clinical practice and consulting. Her work has involved private practice, teaching, training, research and consulting. Her ongoing PhD studies the relationship of psychological type and pathways to optimal functioning.   

This session is part of the AusAPT Online 2020 Conference. It’s just $75AU for AusAPT members and reciprocal members and $100AU for guests for all 12 sessions. Or you can purchase a new member + conference package at $125AU.

You can find the full conference program and details here:

$75 – $125 Full conference price for all 12 sessions including this session!

AusAPT

https://ausapt.org.au/

Online Event

Feature imag photo by Jenna Hamra from Pexels

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Media Puzzle: Responding to Claims about the MBTI® and Psychological Type – Peter Geyer

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